Articles Posted in AstraZeneca

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womanNexium, or esomeprazole, is a drug that is used to treat heartburn and excessive amounts of acid in the stomach. Specifically, it is used to treat duodenal and gastric ulcers, esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Nexium is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) that decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach. Other drugs that are in the same class as Nexium include Prevacid and Prilosec. Approximately 15 million Americans use PPIs that are sold both as prescription and over-the-counter.  Nexium sales exceed $3 billion a year.

  • 2019 Update: These drugs have had a troubled history.  Zantac, which was long considered a great and safe drug, has now been associated with cancer.

Nexium is a controversial drug.  At one point, bone fracture lawsuits were all the rage because there was data suggesting Nexium, particularly the long-term use of Nexium, would cause bone fractures and breaks.  We believed many of these cases were meritorious.  But the litigation did not get very far.

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Our attorneys are investigating potential lawsuits involving Crestor and its possible side effects. There are two types of Crestor cases in particular that have gained the interest of many mass tort lawyers: Crestor induced cardiomyopathy and Crestor induced diabetes.

Crestor is a statin that treats dyslipidemia. Crestor is intended – and probably does – reduce “bad” cholesterol while increasing “good” cholesterol. But Crestor lawsuits allege that Crestor can cause cardiovascular injuries leading to cardiomyopathy and diabetes.

As if that was not a problem enough, rhabdomyolysis has also been linked to Crestor which may lead Crestor patients to suffer kidney injuries.

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This is something every blog must struggle with. What voice should the blog have? First-person (or the blogger variant–the royal first-person, where everything is about “we” and “us,” though the blog is written by one person), or third-person?

SciFi.jpgCorporations frequently choose a corporate voice, making everything about the corporation. The voice of the blog is often the “voice” of the corporation (corporations are legal entities with rights, of course). But this can be tough to read sometimes and still loses the personal flair of a first-person narrative.

So, when my Google Reader blog-feed listed AstraZeneca’s recent post, “Connections for Cardiovascular Health,” I was interested to see that they are gravitating toward a first-person voice. The side panel shows that the main contributor and “voice” is Earl Whipple, the blog editor and senior director in the AZ corporate communications group. The sidebar mentioned that others would contribute (the CEO had a post on March 23), but perusing the posts, it looks like Earl is the only contributor except for occasional guests.

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Drug Recall Lawyer Blog Round-Up (03-22-10)

Here are this week’s stories:

  • Avandia: The MayoClinic investigated who authored articles supporting Avandia in medical journals, and discovered that 90% had ties to the manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (HT: FiercePharma).
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social media and drug companiesUntil now, online social networking has been treated mostly as a plaything for some pharmaceutical manufacturers. They will post a few updates on Twitter, maybe start a Facebook page or post a YouTube video or two, but I have seen little sign that the companies have really bought in, much less that they “get it” (though, some like AstraZeneca may play it safe while the FDA works out the regulation aspect).

Eye on FDA has a good summary of what’s happened to get us to this point. Initially, the FDA was more concerned with the content of pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers’ messages. However, last year the FDA realized that there are only so many contraindications you can fit in 140 characters. So, in September 2009, they took the proactive step of setting a meeting (which BigPharma interestingly did not attend) and encouraging comments (open through last month). The hope is that they will be able to draft some sort of guidelines, so everyone knows where the line is.

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Tons of press on AstraZeneca and their antipsychotic drug Seroquel, lately, much of it dealing with one Dr. Michael Reinstein, a physician who, by all reports, will have to answer a lot of questions about his patients.
Here are the Cliffs Notes:

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