Articles Posted in GlaxoSmithKline

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Drug Recall Lawyer Blog Round-Up (03-22-10)

Here are this week’s stories:

  • Avandia: The MayoClinic investigated who authored articles supporting Avandia in medical journals, and discovered that 90% had ties to the manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (HT: FiercePharma).
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Copy%20of%20Avandia%20Much%20Ado%20about%20nothing%20Sequel-03-05-10%29.JPGYesterday I clicked a link from @pharmaguy: End-of-Life Warning at $618,616 Makes Me Wonder Was It Worth It, an article in Bloomberg by Amanda Bennett. Don’t read it unless you have 5-10 minutes of quiet time—this is a powerful story.

This story, the story of Amanda Bennett, Terrence Bennett, and their children and doctors and the U.S. healthcare system and drugs and drug companies and life and death raises several issues. It questions whether medical cost spending, much of which occurs in the finals days and weeks of life, is worth it. Ms. Bennett calculates that his seven-year medical bill was $618,616, discounted to $254,176. She notes that:

Would I do it all again? Absolutely. I couldn’t not do it again. But I think had he known the costs, Terence would have fought the insurers spending enough, at roughly $200,000, to vaccinate almost a quarter-million children in developing countries. That’s how he would have thought about it.

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Avandia%20Much%20Ado%20about%20nothing-03-04-10%29.JPGToday’s Washington Times featured commentary by Dr. Gilbert Ross. “When Senators Play Doctor: Risk-mongering can stifle innovation, cost lives.”

Dr. Ross essentially argues that the senators have completely misinterpreted the Avandia data, whether intentionally or not, in order to fulfill their objective of creating an independent drug safety division within, but separate from, the FDA. Perhaps Dr. Ross thinks that’s a bad thing—it’s not clear from his commentary. It seems to me that erecting another level of safety in regulating drugs can only be a good thing. But that’s another blog post.

The criticism boils down to the fact that these are senators—mere politicians—who are sticking their noses where they don’t belong—in areas of science of medicine. Unfortunately, we don’t have a separate job for “scientist politicians” who can this job, so our political system is left having to deal with it as it is. Also, the senators criticizing the FDA’s handling of Avandia are undoubtedly relying on the opinions and conclusions of doctors and scientists, mainly because Dr. David Graham, employed by the FDA (the commentary paints him to be an anti-Pharma crusader—perhaps this is true, but perhaps he just puts patient safety a little higher on his list than others do).

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Avandia-logo-02-24-10.jpgIf my Google Reader subscriptions are any indication, about 50% of the new blog posts across the web in the past couple of days have been about Avandia. This post is intended as a hub for basic information on Avandia and the status of the proposed Avandia recall.

Indications:
Avandia is used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. That type of diabetes, commonly called adult-onset diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, is reflected by high blood glucose and insulin deficiency/resistance. Avandia (rosiglitazone), as well as Avandamet and Avandaryl (two drugs combining rosiglitazone with either metformin or glimepiride), is intended to help the body use its natural insulin for better glucose control.

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